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Latin Courses

Readings from the orations and rhetorical writings of Cicero, Quintilian, Seneca Rhetor, and others.

Readings from Roman historical writers such as Caesar, Sallust, Ammianus Marcellinus, and others

Readings from the elegiac works of Tibullus/Sulpicia, Propertius, and Ovid, including studies in the cultural context of Roman poetry, as well as the development of Latin poetic form, meter, and diction.

Readings from the Latin epic poets Ennius, Vergil, Lucan, and others.

Readings from the letters of Cicero, Seneca, Pliny the Younger, and others.

Readings from such satirists as Horace, Juvenal, and others.

Readings from the comedies of Plautus and Terence, and the tragedies of Seneca, and others.

Readings from Lucretius' De Rerum Natura, Vergil's Georgics, and others. The poet as teacher; the manner in which poetic form and imagery express philosophy.

Readings from Latin authors of late antiquity and the Middle Ages. Study of Latin vocabulary and style during late antiquity and the Middle Ages.

Readings from Latin biographical authors such as Nepos, Suetonius, Tacitus, the Scriptores Historiae Augustae, and Einhard.

The positions of Greek and Latin within the Indo-European language family with special attention to the phonological evolution of both Greek and Latin from Proto-Indo-European.

Crosslisted with GREK 4150/6150 and LING 4150/6150.

Readings from the Carmina of Catullus, including studies in the cultural context of Roman poetry, as well as the development of Latin poetic form, meter, and diction.

Readings from the works of Horace, including studies in the cultural context of Roman poetry, as well as the development of Latin poetic form, meter, and diction.

Readings from the Metamorphoses and non-elegiac works of Ovid, including studies in the cultural context of Roman poetry, as well as the development of Latin poetic form, meter, and diction.

This course is also offered through University System of Georgia Independent and Distance Learning…

Readings from the orations and other works of Cicero, and from the works of Caesar, Sallust, and other contemporary writers.

Readings from the Ab Urbe Condita of Livy, with attention to literary and historical issues surrounding the author and his works.

Readings from the Annales, Historiae, and/or minor works of Tacitus, with attention to literary and historical issues surrounding the author and his works.

Readings in one or more Latin authors or genres. Topics to be selected on the basis of student needs.

The development of Latin poetry from the earliest examples through the fourth century CE. Epic, lyric poetry, elegy, tragedy, comedy, satire, epigram, and didactic poetry will be read and discussed. The literary selections will be read in Latin.

The development of Latin prose from the earliest examples through the fourth century CE. History, rhetoric, oratory, philosophy, biography, epistles, the novel, and scientific and technical writing will be read and discussed. The literary selections will be read in Latin.

Principles, methods, materials, and activities for teaching Latin at the P-12 and college levels.

Systematic study and review of advanced Latin grammar through translation exercises from English into Latin

Research while enrolled for a master's degree under the direction of faculty members.

Independent research under the direction of a faculty member.

Thesis writing under the direction of the major professor.

Independent research and thesis preparation.
 

The teaching of elementary Latin at the college level; an introduction to methods and materials. Observations and practice teaching are required.

For two hours credit, the format is one hour lecture + two hours lab per week; for one hour credit, the format is two hours lab per week; for…

Latin prose literature and pertinent critical writings. The topic, author, or genre covered will be determined by the student's previous training and interests.

Latin poetic literature and pertinent critical writings. The topic, author, or genre covered will be determined by the student's previous training and interests.

Undergraduate Programs

UGA Classics explores Greek and Roman culture (material; intellectual; religious) from Troy to Augustine; Classical languages and literatures (Greek, Latin, and in English translation); and the reception of Classical Antiquity with A.B. and M.A. degrees in Classics with multiple areas of emphasis. The Minor in Classical Culture complements degree programs across campus. New to Classics? Take a course with us on campus or in Europe and acquire future-ready skills.

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