Sculpture produced in Rome and the Roman Empire from 200 BC to AD 330 with an emphasis on portraiture, mythological statuary, and state reliefs. Topics of interest include materials and techniques, ancient display and function, literary descriptions of statuary, Roman viewers, and the modern…

Sculpture produced in Rome and the Roman Empire from 200 BC to AD 330 with an emphasis on portraiture, mythological statuary, and state reliefs. Topics of interest include materials and techniques, ancient display and function, literary descriptions of statuary, Roman viewers, and the modern…

The expanding world of Greek culture in the period from 750 to 480 BC, including consideration of the many new and influential developments in art, literature, history, political science, and philosophy, and their interrelationships.

Readings from the orations and rhetorical writings of Cicero, Quintilian, Seneca Rhetor, and others.

The major Greek sanctuaries and their physical remains, and the Greek religious calendar and its important festivals, including the Olympic Games and the Panathanaia.

Study of Hesiod's two surviving poems, the Theogony and the Works and Days, with special attention to the relationship of his language and religious thinking to that of Homer.

The archaeology of the Greek colonies in Ionia, Magna Graecia, and the Black Sea area is examined to identify and explain the combination of Greek and indigenous cultures in these areas on the fringes of the Greek world.

Selected Greek elegy and lyric, with attention to its political and social background, and to the relation of these literary types to epic and dramatic poetry.

Archaeology, art, culture, and history of Greece and the East from the rise of Alexander to Rome's annexation of Egypt.

The Persian and Peloponnesian wars through selected readings.

Readings from the Latin epic poets Ennius, Vergil, Lucan, and others.

Readings from the elegiac works of Tibullus/Sulpicia, Propertius, and Ovid, including studies in the cultural context of Roman poetry, as well as the development of Latin poetic form, meter, and diction.

Readings from Roman historical writers such as Caesar, Sallust, Ammianus Marcellinus, and others

Aeschylus' plays, with emphasis on his theology and special uses of the Greek language.

Readings from the letters of Cicero, Seneca, Pliny the Younger, and others.

Sophocles' plays, with emphasis on the poet's religious and humanistic values and his dramatic style.

Readings from such satirists as Horace, Juvenal, and others.

Examination of the literary, material, and environmental evidence for Roman occupation in Britain; investigation of the interaction between indigenous and Roman populations to illustrate processes of Romanization; examination of the social and economic structure of the Roman frontier in Britain…

Euripides' plays, with emphasis on the poet's dramatic style and his treatment of social, political, and religious themes.

Readings from the comedies of Plautus and Terence, and the tragedies of Seneca, and others.

Selected comedies of Aristophanes. Emphasis is placed on language, style, and thought, and on the generic characteristics of Greek Old Comedy.

Readings from Lucretius' De Rerum Natura, Vergil's Georgics, and others. The poet as teacher; the manner in which poetic form and imagery express philosophy.

Students will read through selections from the Greek New Testament or Septuagint in Greek. While attention will be given to issues of interpretation, the course will focus on Greek translation, grammar, and syntax.

Students will read through selections from the Greek New Testament or Septuagint in Greek. While attention will be given to issues of interpretation, the course will focus on Greek translation, grammar, and syntax.

The dialogues of Plato. Emphasis is placed on the language, style, and philosophical thought of Plato.

Readings from Latin authors of late antiquity and the Middle Ages. Study of Latin vocabulary and style during late antiquity and the Middle Ages.

Selected Roman cities and their architecture; principles upon which they were planned and designed. Roman reworking of the theories of Hippodamus, and study of the architectural writings of Vitruvius. Detailed study of the topography and monuments of various Roman cities, including Rome, Ostia,…

Orations drawn from the works of Demosthenes, Lysias, and Aeschines, with emphasis on the function and techniques of persuasion in oratory and on the political and social contexts of these orations.

Readings from Latin biographical authors such as Nepos, Suetonius, Tacitus, the Scriptores Historiae Augustae, and Einhard.

The art and culture of the people of Northern Italy known as the Etruscans, with special attention to their relationship with the Greek world and their role in the development of Rome as a city.

Pompeii, Herculaneum, and the area destroyed by the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius. Concentration will be on political, social, religious, and economic life, combined with a study of the painting, sculpture, and architecture of the excavated cities and villas.

The archaeology of the Western and/or Eastern provinces of the Roman Empire, concentrating on the major cities and sanctuaries and their physical remains.

The civilization of Roman North Africa from the Punic period through the Arab Conquest, using the important city of Carthage as a model.

Open only to students participating in the University's Carthage excavation.

All aspects of modern field archaeology on a classical site, including excavation techniques, the keeping of field records, and the classification and conservation of finds from the moment of recovery to their final disposition in museums.

Open only to students participating in the…

The positions of Greek and Latin within the Indo-European language family with special attention to the phonological evolution of both Greek and Latin from Proto-Indo-European.

The positions of Greek and Latin within the Indo-European language family with special attention to the phonological evolution of both Greek and Latin from Proto-Indo-European.

The positions of Greek and Latin within the Indo-European language family with special attention to the phonological evolution of both Greek and Latin from Proto-Indo-European.

The literature and history of late antiquity (270-400 AD) with attention to political, social, intellectual, and religious developments

Ancient comedy in English translation, concentrating on fifth-century Athens, and tracing its changing focus through Menander to Plautus and Terence; also considered will be the theoretical basis of comedy as discussed by Aristotle and others, as well as the place of comedy within the history of…

Selected Greek authors to be chosen according to the interests of students and instructor.

Readings from the Carmina of Catullus, including studies in the cultural context of Roman poetry, as well as the development of Latin poetic form, meter, and diction.

The conventions of classical tragedy as exemplified in the plays (in English translation) of the Greek dramatists Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, as well as the Roman tragedian Seneca.

Readings from the works of Horace, including studies in the cultural context of Roman poetry, as well as the development of Latin poetic form, meter, and diction.

The epic poetry of Greece and Rome with emphasis on Homer and Vergil, some attention being given to other epic works, such as those by Apollonius of Rhodes, Ennius, and Lucan. The historical and cultural background of epic will be examined, and the poems will be read in English translation.

Readings from the Metamorphoses and non-elegiac works of Ovid, including studies in the cultural context of Roman poetry, as well as the development of Latin poetic form, meter, and diction.

This course is also offered through University System of Georgia Independent and Distance Learning…

The origins of the rationalist tradition in medicine; folk and cult methods of healing; the medical construction of gender differences; attitudes toward the body, including asceticism; and topics in the social history of medicine (such as childbirth, disease, and medical society) will be…

Classical rhetoric, with special attention to Plato, Aristotle, and Cicero.

The interpretation and analysis of ancient myths, particularly those of Greece and Rome.

Ancient prose fiction (in English translation), including the Latin novels of Petronius and Apuleius and examples of the Greek novel. Topics include the relationship between the novel and other literary genres, the social and intellectual background of the authors, the themes of love, travel,…

An examination of the influence and reception of classical texts in the literature and culture of later eras (e.g., the Middle Ages and Renaissance).

Special topics in the civilization of Greece and Rome. Topics will vary as demand requires

The development of Greek poetry from Homer through the Hellenistic period. Epic, lyric poetry, tragedy, comedy, hymns and epigrams will be read and discussed. This course will be read in Greek.

Readings from the orations and other works of Cicero, and from the works of Caesar, Sallust, and other contemporary writers.

Special topics in the civilization of ancient Greece and Rome. Topics will vary as demand requires.

Studies Abroad

Readings from the Ab Urbe Condita of Livy, with attention to literary and historical issues surrounding the author and his works.

Law and its functions in ancient society from archaic Greece through the fifth century A.D. Includes discussion of Greek, Roman, and Christian legal codes, legal procedure, and the theory of law; also of law as a source for social history, especially issues of gender, class, crime, and the…

Law and its functions in ancient society from archaic Greece through the fifth century A.D. Includes discussion of Greek, Roman, and Christian legal codes, legal procedure, and the theory of law; also of law as a source for social history, especially issues of gender, class, crime, and the…

Readings from the Annales, Historiae, and/or minor works of Tacitus, with attention to literary and historical issues surrounding the author and his works.

Topics in ancient history that vary by year and instructor. Subject matter may include, for example, "The Hellenistic World"; "The Social History of the Roman Empire"; "Late Antiquity."

Topics in ancient history that vary by year and instructor. Subject matter may include, for example, "The Hellenistic World"; "The Social History of the Roman Empire"; "Late Antiquity."

An examination of the ancient Greek theater and theatrical performance.

Examination of the archaeological, literary, and environmental evidence for the ancient city of Athens, from the Dark Ages through the Roman period, with special emphasis on the creation of the polis, its social, economic, and cultural systems, and its place within the wider Greek world.

Examination of the archaeological, literary, and topographical evidence for the ancient city of Rome, from the Regal period through the fourth century A.D., with special emphasis on the architectural development of the urban/suburban continuum in ancient Rome and its environs.

Studies…

Introduction to social science aspects of the ancient world: the economy, agriculture, demography, nourishment, disease. The course includes us of theoretical models and comparative material from other societies to illuminate equivalent aspects of the ancient world, where often not enough…

This course traces the tragic and comic texts and performance contexts of the Roman theatre and the theatricality of spectacle and politics in the Roman Republic and early Imperial Rome. Emphasis is placed on theatre design and spectacle entertainment and the legacy of Rome on British and…

An examination of funerals, disposal, and the commemoration of the dead in ancient Greece and Italy and the legacy of ancient death in the modern era from Medieval to contemporary practices. Emphasis is placed on death in the urban and suburban landscape and the changing periphery of the dead.…

Examination of the ruins and monuments of Classical antiquity in Greece, Italy, and Egypt as the literal and figurative destinations of the Grand Tour and the inspiration for Neoclassicism in Europe and North America that imitated the grandeur of Classical antiquity in politics, the arts and…

A.D., with special emphasis on its production in the city of Rome and in Italy and its relationship to Etruscan, Greek, and Italic art.

Course offered in Rome Studies Abroad program.

The development of Greek prose through the second century C.E. Philosophical, historical, medical forensic, and narrative will be read and discussed. The literature selections will be read in Greek.

Readings in one or more Latin authors or genres. Topics to be selected on the basis of student needs.

Readings in one or more Latin authors or genres. Topics to be selected on the basis of student needs.

Study abroad

The development of Latin poetry from the earliest examples through the fourth century CE. Epic, lyric poetry, elegy, tragedy, comedy, satire, epigram, and didactic poetry will be read and discussed. The literary selections will be read in Latin.

The development of Latin prose from the earliest examples through the fourth century CE. History, rhetoric, oratory, philosophy, biography, epistles, the novel, and scientific and technical writing will be read and discussed. The literary selections will be read in Latin.

The phonology, morphology, and syntax of the classical Sanskrit language, emphasizing the position of Sanskrit within the Indo-European language family and its importance for Indo-European linguistics.

The phonology, morphology, and syntax of the classical Sanskrit language, emphasizing the position of Sanskrit within the Indo-European language family and its importance for Indo-European linguistics.

Continued studies in both the synchronic and diachronic grammar of classical Sanskrit.

Continued studies in both the synchronic and diachronic grammar of classical Sanskrit.

Principles, methods, materials, and activities for teaching Latin at the P-12 and college levels.

Systematic study and review of advanced Greek grammar through translation exercises from English into Greek

Systematic study and review of advanced Latin grammar through translation exercises from English into Latin

Research while enrolled for a master's degree under the direction of faculty members.

Independent research under the direction of a faculty member.

Research while enrolled for a master's degree under the direction of faculty members.

Independent research under the direction of a faculty member.

Research while enrolled for a master's degree under the direction of faculty members.

Independent research under the direction of a faculty member.

Thesis writing under the direction of the major professor.

Independent research and thesis preparation.

Thesis writing under the direction of the major professor.

Independent research and thesis preparation.

Thesis writing under the direction of the major professor.

Independent research and thesis preparation.
 

The teaching of elementary Latin at the college level; an introduction to methods and materials. Observations and practice teaching are required.

For two hours credit, the format is one hour lecture + two hours lab per week; for one hour credit, the format is two hours lab per week; for…

Methods, history, and bibliography in philology and other areas of the classics as a background to graduate study in Greek and/or Latin.

Latin prose literature and pertinent critical writings. The topic, author, or genre covered will be determined by the student's previous training and interests.

Topics in Roman literature or civilization.

Latin poetic literature and pertinent critical writings. The topic, author, or genre covered will be determined by the student's previous training and interests.